About your Search

20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
of july 3, they were going to seize as many friendships as they possibly could by agreement, hopefully, but if not, by force. and they figured in portsmouth and plymouth, england, this would be fairly easy because these ports are surrounded by british ships and british coastal batteries and that kind of thing. and in alexandria, egypt, kind of the same thing because there was a british port with british ports and big guns and british fleet around. there was a different situation because there was only a french flotilla, a french naval base, and the admiralty which is the british naval command radioed, of course in code, to the fleet in gibraltar, and they said this is what you have to do. you have to sail through the night of july 2 and 3rd, and show up at dawn. and give our terms to the french fleet. and the terms were, or were going to be, you were our loyal allies in the fight against the germans, up until just days ago. sail out of the port and join us in the fight against the germans. if you can't do that, give us your ships. we will sell them with the british sailors and give the
of our country this last summer. how is it, you might wonder, that we had devastating fires in july and august and into september, devastating drought, and we still haven't approved the disaster assistance? well, i would say it's 100% unacceptable. if you lost your ranch in a fire, if you lost your fencing, if you lost your livestock, and the program that would have helped, that has always been in place for disaster assistance wasn't reauthorized, then you've been stranded since june or since july or since august. and perhaps in that interim, you've lost your farm. perhaps you lost your ranch. perhaps you've mortgaged everything to try to hold on. and yet, here is the u.s. senate saying, hey, it's okay that we're not helping you now because you know what? we're going to help you in the farm bill. well, where is the farm bill? it's not on the president's desk. it isn't in route to the president's desk. it hasn't even been brought up on the floor of the u.s. house. a bipartisan group of senators in this body approved a farm bill and had the disaster relief for our ranchers and farmers
with those marines. he took leave the first of july and secretly married theresa. july 10 was the last time i saw him. he arrived in afghanistan the end of july and wrote these final words in his journal on august 2. mom, dad, i can never repay you for all you have done for me. you made me into the man i am today. i hope that i have made you proud. that has always been my goal. i love you both so much. tell the girls i love them and couldn't be prouder older brother. i have always tried to be an honorable man and i truly believe in what we are doing here. i am doing this for my family so that they need not fear. my country so that can be a beacon of light for the entire world. the men around me because no one could ask for it better company than the u.s. armed forces and finally, i do this for myself so that i might know the measure of myself and in and not be found wanting. i believe that it is my duty to fight and having done all that i can to simply stand against this and all the evil work that is upon this earth. he called me on the fifth and said, the people are so nice and the kids are
, this is a photograph of dory here at heart mountain and he was taken either in july 1943 or july 1944. we can't be sure which. its daytime. nothing suspicious about it, not the surreptitious about it in the barracks and background ec takes place in an open, public space within the residential area of the camp itself. just check this image. so there's something else that's special about this image. it's in color. brilliant, beautiful color. take this photograph of the same event at heart mountain taken up by government photographer, but one of the internees in camp. just checked out of. look at that, the color restored. by taking color photographs and remove the color so you can see them the way we are accustomed to seeing this area and in the weekly for shot by the photographer. i want to take a moment and ask you what the impact is right up to your couple comments. what is the impact of seeing this historical moment in color rather than in black-and-white? could a couple of you put into words what the difference might need of seeing it in color as opposed to black-and-white? >> when i saw the colors,
in that we have the faces received that the congress result of independence fourth of july and have declared war. two issues later the one of the principal text of the declaration. here's a january 23rd, 1777 issue. since printed in boston. this is the front page account of george washington crusting the delaware. bruce chadwick contributed the essay in trenton and princeton, the phrase washington years that they surrendered because they were about to be cut to pieces. it was somewhat harsh language to come from the future president. we also read in the newspapers about john paul jones, the first naval hero. during the account, you read of what is in essence a fashion reporter. paula jones, who is dressed in a short jacket and long trousers with a definite edge was fun and about around his middle. decisions about areas. john paul jones is the mortal words have not yet begun to fight. turns out he likely didn't say that and what he probably said this was printed, in this case thea read the quotes him as saying i may think, now began to face her. saratoga, turning point of the war. i was struc
and cabinet in july 1962 great tapes include numerous discussions on topics of the day, including the q1 missile crisis in vietnam. this is about one hour. >> good evening, ladies and gentlemen. i am tommy nottingham the director of the jfk library foundation. tom putnam is the director of the presidential museum and i thank you all for coming here this evening. let me begin by acknowledging generous underwriters of the kennedy form, bank of america, boston capital, global institute, the boston foundation, and the media partners. tonight's forum is a very special one for those who work at the john f. kennedy library and the same. the publication of the "listening in", which is now on sale in our museum store, was simply not possible if not for the incredible skills and talent and professionalism and dedication of our library staff and government employees. there is one person in particular, one person that tom putnam and i would like to acknowledge. and it isn't archivist that has been overseeing the classification of these recordings and who knows more about these 265 hours of president
begins, it's late july, 1992, and i'm on a flight from washington, d.c. to charlotte, north carolina. i had been an intern that summer up on capitol hill, and one of my regrets of the summer was that i'd never seen strom thurmond. because all my fellow interns said you've got to see strom thurmond. he such an unusual appearance about him. i did know what they meant really your but i had my suspicions. so i'm on the flight and a look ahead in front of me and i see a man who's got kind of orange colored hair practically, so brightly colored. first generation hair plugs. shows you how slow i am that i think to myself, that must be what strom thurmond's head looks like. then, of course, it wasn't strom thurmond. i knew that when people reaching over trying to shake his hand. i wanted to shake his hand, too, because i'd been in d.c. that summer for the first time, and i met all of these politicians i've seen a tv. i was about to go home and speak to my dads rotary club and i wanted to tell them all about the famous people i met up in washington, d.c. and so i was going to try to shake his ha
and is reported favorably by the senate judiciary committee last july. i hope senators will support it. i'm leave pleased that senatorse joined me as cosponsors of this amendment. i call on all senators who talk about accountability and oversight to join with us to adopt this better approach to ensuring our security and our privacy. in june, after the senate intelligence committee originated the senate bill to reauthorize and extend fisa, senator grassley and i asked for a sequential referral, one that would allow the judiciary committee to consider and improve this important legislation, which under the rules we could. the bill that was approved by the intelligence committee provided for a general and really unfettered extension of the expired provisions until june 2017. i hope that we could approve that and we did. i worked with the distinguished chair of the senate intelligence committee to craft a compromise to assure the extension until 2015 you go also add some -- but also add some accountability in the overite oversight provision. i appreciated the senator from california's help and strong
montana lassoed july eisenhower with his permission. in the afternoon of inauguration day backend 1829, there was a sort of stampede on the white house. they had a big party at the people trampled the place, trampled the white house with their muddy boots and the wrecked the curtains and the carpeting and finally the fiasco ended when assembly of the brilliant idea of putting a large tub of whiskey out on the white house lawn slowly but surely every left 1953 there's the kennedys and 61, george and laura bush, bartok and michelle obama and planned inaugurations are also a big part of inauguration day. it's not really the inauguration day that they are a part of the history. you can't deny this and many of us even remember 49 years ago next year will be the 50th anniversary of the assassination of john f. kennedy followed by lyndon johnson being sworn in aboard air force one in dallas. he was sworn in by federal district judge sarah hughes, the only woman to ever swear in a president. here is a gerald r. ford being sworn in in the white house in 1974 after richard nixon resigned in disg
, but maybe if kids haven't been exposed to reading and learning in the the july of it that the money or the lower form of motivation a kickstart the habit and then the haven't might take and they will carry on reading for the love of it. that is the counter argument. and it's difficult to know in any given case, any given unit of a cash incentive with the effect will be. a friend of mine that pays his younger children of dollar for each thank you note the right. i have received some of these. [laughter] and i can tell by reading them that they were written under a certain pressure. my wife and i look at this practice. now it could be by being paid to write thank you notes it will be the expression of gratitude and when someone stops paying them they will carry on writing them. it could work out the other way. the dollar is taking notes to be written by money and one lesson they learned when the money stops on the thank you notes they may never learn the virtue of gratitude and the education will have been corrupt that is the wording. what do these examples and scenarios and debates t
. julie noted in for her biography of her mother that pat snuck away from the family of two goodies to go over her written notes and organize her thoughts for the upcoming trip. the state department staff repaired remarks for her she went over them making changes where she felt necessary and highlighting point she wanted to emphasize. in liberia sheen -- by noticing how i'm -- noting noting our press she was by the considerable development that occurred since your last visit in 1957. in ghana she traveled out of the hills to pay her respects to 83-year-old chief who she met during the vice president so visit. he told her that she had forged a friendship between the american and ghanaian people that quote not even a line could rake in quote. before she left ghana she spoke before the national assembly living a rare public political speech. in each of the three countries pat spoke with the leaders about her husband's upcoming trip to china explaining that he did not intend to normalize relations but to open a dialogue. she also reiteratereiterated america's promise of financial assistan
mccain to sponsor a burma sanction bill, sanctions were put in place in 1997 and only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates and we continue to work on behalf of the people of burma. in 2003 following an assassination attempt senator mcconnell and i worked to pass an important man the remains in place today, an effort to bring about further reform and i must say burma is extremely lucky to have a champion like aung san suu kyi. in the face of violence, intimidation, harassment, she has never wavered from her principles or ceased her push for democracy and human rights. she celebrates the relief of political prisoners including approximately 90 released this week but she remains true to them to remain behind bars, a number estimated to be around 200. this woman sacrificed many years of her life to bring about these changes. she is truly an inspiration to the world. you are so well deserving of this congressional gold medal i can only begin to express my thrills and happiness that we are able to present this to you today in this
years. it took hard work on the part of me and julie tate of the washington post and gabriel banks who was my researcher and she was living in los angeles and the three of us trying deleted everything and i found her fill. i can't tell all of that story because to protect her not because of the book but because she had an abusive ex-husband and we don't want to find her. in any case -- we started with just the name genevieve. i found -- a wedding announcement in the new york times ran a lot of bells because it had indonesia in it, conn. in it, obama in his memoir starts about taking it up to her family's estates in the pond in wealthy areas in connecticut. it stuck with me and studied court records, i found another name for her and tracked her down and made the call. we have a lot of conversations since then. >> host: you write in your book, quoting vino mahmoud. he had never had many black friends. i saw that switch happen most markedly during the period that i was very close to him. he was the most deliberate person i ever met in terms of constructing his own identity and his achieve
're doing a little bit. >> yeah. so this was not a happy afternoon. this was fourth of july weekend a couple of years ago, and one of our board members at interfaith youth corps is director at mcends si and company. and he had said to me, you know, let's do a pro bono assessment of how this organization has been doing over the first eight years of its existence, and i was like, you know with, great. spend your mcends si money and tell us how great we're doing, right? and i didn't know that's not how consulting generally works. so my wife had promised as we're heading up to ta reck's house july 4th weekend, she's like no shoptalk. and i'm like, you know, who's talking shop? we're just going to have a great time looking out over the lake and enjoying steaks. so he looks at me, and he's like so i'm getting some of the data back from our assessment of interfaith youth corps, and i was like, yeah? and he's like, yeah. it's not going so great. and i'm like, come again? it's not going so great. i'm like, what are you talking about? i also didn't know how concrete consultants can get. he's like, wel
right now between what has happened in benghazi and the attack and what happens back in july of 2011 when the rebel commander was assassinated. that event precipitated -- still not liberated. people were thinking, this is the end of the revolution. and come back and like everybody out. in fact, what happened was that most often, the head of the in d.c. the time use that as a means of essentially quieting his detractors and consolidating power and helping move forward the onslaught on tripoli. to the extent that now we have what appears to be a progressive , more forceful, and i'm saying that qualifying, i don't have as much detail as i would like. new prime minister, you know, there's an opportunity here to maybe consolidate and something better will come out of the seven near future. anyway. i'm very happy to take any questions. >> thank you. i know that many of us have questions. as the way into the microphone comes to you identify yourself. >> yes. we hear a lot about tribal militias wreaking unpredictable havoc here and there and making things very and predictable and messy. can
in this rain. >> i will even hide the book. [inaudible conversations] [laughter] >> julie. >> how are you? good to see you. how if web you been? >> i've been well. how about you? >> here i am. >> it's so good to see you. .. >> can i get a picture with you, to require? is one of those roaming errors. it's a brand-new day. okay, get in here. don hardy. >> this is one of my students. this is one of my finest students. he is of the face. >> i'm in the white house now. [inaudible] [inaudible conversations] >> that's how project sessions start. >> it's you, margaret. >> it's me, margaret. [inaudible] >> wow. >> his mother was judge alice k. birdie, big democrat with 13 children. i voice, for gross. >> i wish i could've been your author. >> used to take the whole staff over. >> my goodness. >> we are all here. >> you remember my wife, sir. >> good to see you off. [inaudible conversations] >> how are you doing? >> they have a copy yet. >> we were together at treasury, so they get together every once in a while and trade stories. [inaudible] >> the guy with the radio. [laughter] >> they don't know your
broad presidential powers. then about the third week of august, 1803 -- that was the fourth of july. about the third or week of august he gets a letter from france saying napoleon was having second thoughts. so severeson says, well, i do think we have the power there, and, boom, it's done. [laughter] franklin roosevelt, when he was taking the critical steps to preparing us and providing aid to britain in the runup to the great contest over liberty in the middle of the 20th century explicitly pointed to the louisiana purchase as a model for what an executive should do in a teem of crisis. in a time of crisis. jefferson himself said that the duty of a magistrate is to the line of the law, but it is not the highest duty. that the survival and success of the country is your highest obligation. one person's imperial president i is another person's hero. one person's tyranny is another person's brilliant reform. part of what we have to struggle with from age to age in america is realizing that some generations there's going to be an excess of power useed in a way -- used in a way in which
what was going to happen because this hasn't been discussed in july. but obviously, this is a very momentous meeting. they walked in, said don and lincoln reaches over and announces that he just got a wonderful ship it in the mail that he wants to share with them. and it's a book of humorous short stories by a comic writer and he insists on reading one of them allowed. really from our case today, humor, dialect humor about a guy who has a traveling? figure museum and he goes into utica, new york and some group they are mistakes his actual betrayer of christ, smashes his? figure, really story. when he gets to the end, he roars with laughter. some and compared his last to a horse. and according to one account, dead silence from the cabinet. nobody laughed. and he said, why don't you laugh? hereunder as much much pressure as i am and if i didn't laugh, i would die. some of his stories were long shaggy dog stories. many of them i cannot repeat on c-span. but he had some one-liners as well. it is the two-faced politician and he said if i had two faces, what i wait this one? his humor wa
johnson. the clinton administration and iman. in july 1999, secretary cuomo announced fannie and freddie would increase the percentage of their mortgage financing that went too low or moderate income families to 50% in 2001 from 42% that was set back in 1995. these new rules would provide affordable housing for 28.1 million families over the next decade. think about it. cuomo could promise to create 20.1 million homeowners without asking congress to set down a single penny. simply told fannie and freddie to do it. and they said we would be delighted. you remember how jesus said 5,000. cuomo housed twenty-eight.1 million. rains also has ambitious goals for profits. he set a goal of doubling earnings to $6.46 per share within five years and this $6.46 number was taken seriously by his team. this is a pep talk from a senior vice president at fannie mae. you must be able to say it in your sleep and forwards and backwards, raging fire in your belly that burns away all doubts, you must live, breathe and dream 646. fannie did meet that earnings goal. the securities and exchange commission found
was turning out to be really hard. july 1776 by december had turned into a editor, painful, depressive, demoralizing series. in washington rewrite a pamphlet called the crisis, which begins these are the times. washington understood the first you win the argument menu in the word. people had to believe. i came here to say to you, we have no reason to despair. you have no reason to back off. you have no reason. we have every reason to behave this parents. any questions? [applause] [applause] >> said the speaker has been kind enough to give us an temper questions than answers. if you have one come raise your hand. if you could wait to leak at the in your hand, so everyone can hear it, that would be great. we will start over here. >> first of all, mr. speaker, i'd like to congratulate you in thank you for coming out and be demanded to read that his willing to fight the good fight. we appreciate that. [applause] and i agree with you that we have also her, we've lost the battle we have to continue to pay. some of the things we should all think about going forward is a need to make sure the
the arkansas up the river in mississippi and it came down all by itself and attacked the union fleet in july of 1862. the confederates had gotten two raider, the florida and the alabama, built in britain, and they were being loosed on the seas now in the summer and fall of 1862. the union navy had captured galveston in october 1862 but the confederates counter-taked on new year's day and drove them out. so the momentum of the war had seemed to be reversed. and it took awhile before it would swing back in the union favor again. >> craig, jim mentioned haleck's reluctance to involve himself. walk house the development of the understanding of the urgent need for joint operations? >> i was just going to say the broader question behind this is the fact there was no protocol no understanding, and very little experience in the history of the united states that would allow the navy and the army to work as partners on a single team. we have to remember that the national security act of 1947 is a post-world war ii phenomenon that create third joint chiefs of staff, secretary of defense. during the civ
or six months, since july 25, speaker boehner could have brought the senate poifd middle-class tax cut legislation to a vote in the house and it would pass. but he's made the decision he's not going to let a vote on that because if he led he let it be voted upon, it would pass. i've said here, mr. president, it's not too late for the speaker to take up the senate-passed bill, but that time is even wiping down. today is thursday. he's going to give 48 hours' notice to the house before they come back so 48 hours from today is saturday. with just that one vote, middle-class families would have the security their taxes wouldn't go up by at least $2,200 on new year's day. that's the average. some would go up more, some less, of course. speaker boehner should call members of the house back to washington today. he shouldn't have let them go, in fact. they're not here. they are not here. john boehner seems to care more about keeping his speakership than keeping the nation on a firm financial footing. it's obvious what's going on. he's waiting until january 3 to get reelected to speaker because
card. u.s. be rambling the ears. >> come al west again. around july 4th. >> let us know. give us notice. a lot of people com. sometimes i look at the driveway and then go into the basement. anybody in there? [laughter] >> i've done that. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> thank-you for all your work. we need people like you. >> when needed. >> thank you. it's great. it's great to see you. >> you'd like to get out here. [inaudible conversations] >> easier. the word in this same year. let's get going. [applause] one. >> good evening, everyone. i didn't hear you. hi. i am thrilled to welcome you to this special evening for a very dear friend. ethier at this fabulous hotel, the jefferson, i would like to introduce you to peter grossman, one of our co-hosts. will you come and say hello. [applause] >> thank you. just very briefly on behalf of connie it's an absolute thrill to be hosting senator simpson and his former chief of staff and biographer this evening. we are excited. shooting from the li
what you're doing. >> this was not a happy afternoon. this was fourth of july weekend a couple of years ago. .. >> i said, what are you talking about? i didn't know how concrete consultants can get sometimes. he said when you speak at a college campus on the people really like speakers, the three months, six months, nine months or 12 months later, they are not really taking action. and i said, you know, this does not sound great. that he doesn't -- instead, actually, i have a theory about this, and i said, what is your theory? he said my theory is it's your fault. [laughter] so i kind of wish i hadn't asked that question. he said the problem, eboo patel, is when you talk about interfaith cooperation from you talk about many different things. people can't and won't do a hundred different things. you have to be able to articulate an aspirational vision of this and we did people take action. and not measure your effectiveness by the applause after speeches. effectiveness is interfaith cooperation and how many people are becoming interfaith leaders, starting their own interfaith programs on
is a result of the dedi many people over so many years. our editor, july aye abrahamson, her deputy, and the editor of the book review, continue to show case our book coverage as a pillar of the times brand, maintaining that same integrity that my great grandfather intended when he instituted it from 115 years ago. unfortunately, sam could not be with us tonight. so, to jill and dean and to my other colleagues from "the new york times" who are sitting there at table 31, and also to chip legraph, sam's predecessor who is seated over there i'm so pleased to be able to share tonight's celebration with you, and so, too, is mark thompson, our ceo of the last three days, at the times, who joined us tonight. so thank you all. [applause] >> the book business is indeed very similar the news boons. at the end of the day we both tell stories. your readers, like ours, have options on how to experience these stories, whether it's lit up on a screen or printed on the pages of a paperback, people are still reading. and that's why the times is committed to investing in and growing our book coverage
it was in ulster. i think last year it was in leeds. and i attended in july of this year, and i was -- the mag enough sense of the occasion that the geography -- slipped my mind dish nottingham, and nottingham is a very, very important part of the east midlands. we must not forget nottingham. i promise never again to forget it was in nottingham. [applause] >> and i hope that the two members who are still here, and thank you for staying as long as you have, and angela what who was with us and spoke with passion as well as andrew and ed earlier, will agree that the quality of the debate really was very, very, very striking. i guess it's inevitable that the more often you meet, the more committed the parliament becomes, the greater level of interest, the more research, the stronger the contributions, the more passionate the speeches, and today i really did think it was very impressive performance, and you have chosen your subject, not us, chosen by you to be power premiere campaign issue of the year. i want in drawing the proceedings to a close, to say a huge thank you to all who have facilitated
rank in the foreign service career ambassador and became deputy secretary of state in july of 2011. she is only the second serving career diplomat in history to become deputy secretary and ambassador burns served from 2008 to 2011 as undersecretary for political affairs as assistant secretary of state for near eastern affairs from 01 to 05 and and esther jordan from 08 to 2001. ambassador burns served in a number of other posts in the foreign service in '82 and putting the executive secretary of the state department and a special assistant secretary to christopher albright and acting director of principal deputy director of the state department policy planning staff. ambassador burns is the recipient of the two presidential distinguished service awards and a member of department of state awards and all well learned. thank you. thomas nides is the deputy secretary of state for management and resources serving as the chief operating officer of the department. prior to joining the administration, mr. nides was the chief operating officer of morgan stanley from 2005 to 2010 before joining m
resource for anyone looking to become more familiar with how government works and capitol hill. >> julie watches c-span on verizon, c-span created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought as a public service by your television provider. [applause] >> justice anthony kennedy spoke at the heritage some asian as a part of a lecture series called preserve the constitution. he said it's the duty of every american to fulfill the constitution. he was introduced by the former attorney general's. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and gentlemen. it's great for me to be able to join john and welcome you here to this lecture. this is the fifth annual occasion on which we have had this lecture and i'm sure you all know the heritage foundation vision is to build an america where freedom, opportunity, prosperity and civil society flourished. to help achieve this, the center for legal and judicial studies launched the preserve the constitution series, which is an annual lecture series to inform and educate citizens on topics related to the constitution and the rule of law. the preserved constitution s
this, it was not a last-minute thing. we passed this out in july of the senate judiciary committee. we did it quickly so that we would not be in this last-minute matter. this has no operational impact on the intelligence community, but it does ensure the strongest of oversight. i hope that -- i hope senators will support it and i yield the floor. mrs. feinstein: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. feinstein: i rise to oppose this amendment and indicate the administration opposes the amendment. we have just four days to reauthorize this critical intelligence tool before it expires. that's the reason for having the house bill before us today. the house bill is a clean bill. it extends the program to 2017, when it would sunset and be -- and would meet another -- need another reauthorization. i believe we must pass this bill now. i believe that 2017 is the appropriate date. it gets the job done. i'm very worried if we do anything else, if we pass any one of these amendments, we will jeopardize the continuation of what is a vital intelligence tool. so reg
and put our initial application in april and then it was a lot of back-and-forth. and until july when they finally said that they would give us access to. but then we didn't get access to it and we still haven't received access to it. now in all fairness, at bat -- inhofe late august we were sued by the aclu that we didn't prevent us from being a will to get access to the database what we would be able to do with it after that point and we haven't received access to the database. the discussions have just basically gone bats appointing because we are trying to do the right thing. we don't want to accuse somebody that is assisting the united states that they are not able to vote and they are not a citizen. that same database gives us time and information on individual citizenship and would allow us to make sure to have the 3,500 eda two that we would be able to find out that who is a citizen and who isn't. we know what least six of those individuals were not citizens because the department of investigation did find that out through the investigative work that takes a lot of time we wou
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)